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Missionary Spotlight – Opportunities in Mozambique

March 2002 | by Karl Peterson

Christian missionaries have freedom to work in Mozambique provided they do so responsibly. There are many opportunities. Here are some examples.

 

Unreached

 

First, northern Mozambique is an area where Islam is strong and many people have never heard the name of Christ. However, some missionaries are working in rural areas and larger towns like Nampula, Pemba and Lichinga.

The civil war forced many to take refuge in cities like Maputo and Beira. There is a need for urban church planting in these places.

Secondly, the non-African population of Mozambique provides a pioneer mission field. This comprises large numbers of Muslims and Hindus, various Chinese, and Portuguese who have returned to their former colony.

Those involved in the relatively untouched areas of military and prison chaplaincy report gratifying results. Here too is an open door.

Mass media

 

Thirdly, the mass media have yet to be fully exploited by Evangelicals.

Most Mozambicans own a radio. Radios FEBA and TWR beam programmes into the country, but there is scope for more to be done. For example, there is need for a Radio Bible Correspondence School for preachers labouring in rural areas and unable to attend Bible college.

Some households own a TV (perhaps powered by a car battery). They leave them on continually, filling their homes with filthy soap operas of Brazilian origin.

The Roman Catholic Church and the Church of the Universal Kingdom of God (a Brazilian prosperity cult) also broadcast their TV programmes.

Should Evangelicals be the last group in Mozambique to have a TV ministry?

Bookshops

 

The only bookstores selling Evangelical literature are at Nampula (Reformed literature under the auspices of Editora Fiel), Maputo and Beira.

Otherwise, Evangelical literature can only be obtained from the personal stocks of missionaries or from Bible Schools.

Editora Fiel’s Reformed literature ministry only meets a little of the immense need (its books are devoured at pastors’ conferences). Again, there is scope for much more to be done.

Fourthly, a Bible School in the city of Nampula is needed.

Fifthly, missionaries in nations like Zambia and Zimbabwe have entered the state educational system as teachers of Religious Education and seen lasting fruit.

Nothing like this has been attempted in Mozambique, but there may be an open door, as the government has lately said much about reviewing the national curriculum.

Finally, there is an urgent need for the development of a simple Sunday school curriculum and the training of Sunday school teachers.

Bible teaching

 

In spite of the relative poverty of Mozambique, the most effective help any missionary can render is plenteous, simple, consistent and culturally relevant Bible teaching.

Material development projects are not to be undervalued. But biblical ignorance calls for missionaries whose primary work is to teach the Bible and its glorious message of Jesus Christ.

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Mozambique