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All articles by Rod Badams

Rod Badams is retiring on 11 November after 13 years as administrator of the Fellowship of Evangelical Churches (FIEC). He previously worked for Christians at Work for 22 years, after 11 years in journalism.

In his FIEC role, Rod was best known for his contributions to evangelical perspectives on current social issues, and for the advice
and information he gave to churches on a wide range of practical subjects with legal or regulatory implications.

In retirement, he will continue as editor of Affinity’s online social issues publication The Bulletin, and in his recent
appointment as a trustee of the Christian Institute.

News

April 2018
News > Society

Society – Britain ditching marriage

Marriage is less popular in England and Wales than at any time since records began in 1862, as statistics reflect the sad story of what is happening within our nation. Statistics for opposite-sex marriages in 2015, published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) on 28 February 2018, show that only 2.17 per cent of eligible men (unmarried men over the age of 16), and 1.98 per cent of eligible women, married in 2015. The popularity of marriage was at its peak in 1972, when the equivalent figures were 7.84 per cent for men and 6.05 per cent for women. This means that the proportion...

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News

May 2017
News

Society – Marriage trends in England and Wales

Marriage statistics for 2014 — the first year in which same-sex couples could marry in Britain — have defied expectations. The figures for 2013, the last year in which all marriages involved opposite-sex couples, sounded further alarm bells about attitudes to marriage in Britain. In that year, only 240,854 couples were married in England and Wales, more than eight per cent fewer than in 2012. In the light of those disturbing figures a number of evangelical commentators, myself included, felt that if marriage was in decline even before the new marriage definition became a reality, then its implementation in 2014 would shrink the statistics still...

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Scottish census

News

December 2013
News

Scottish census

  Christianity is in steep decline in Scotland, and the proportion of its population professing to be Christian is well below the equivalent figure for England and Wales. In 2001, 65.2 per cent of the country’s 5,062,000 people claimed to be Christian. Ten years later, this proportion has dropped to 53.8 per cent of the 5,295,000 population. In the land of John Knox, whose history has been blessed with numerous significant Christian revivals, these figures indicate the continued decline of the influence of the Christian faith in Scotland. The analysis of the findings of the question on religion in the 2011 census was released in...

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London surprise

News

September 2013
News

London surprise

Church attendance in London is significantly on the rise, bucking the trend of a steady decline in churchgoing across the nation over the past 30 years. While England has lost 2.2 million churchgoers since 1979, London attendances rose by 98,500 to 721,500 between 2005 and 2012 — an increase of 16 per cent. The proportion of Londoners attending church is now 8.8 per cent, compared with 5.6 per cent in the rest of England. In addition to those attending on Sundays, a further 120,000 attend activities during the week. If these were included in the headline figures, it would mean that slightly over 10 per...

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News

July 2013
News

Farewell to faith

The future pattern of religion in England and Wales is starkly set out in new figures from the 2011 census, published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in May. These latest statistics (see p. 4) describe a religious demography increasingly different from the traditional pattern of nominal Christianity which had characterised twentieth century Britain. The ONS findings, published in December 2012 and reported in the February 2013 issue of Evangelical Times, had already revealed a reduction in the proportion of the population claiming to be Christian — down from 71.7 per cent in 2001 to 59.3 per cent in 2011. The more recent data...

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Britain’s sunset Christianity

News

February 2013
News

Britain’s sunset Christianity

Britain’s sunset Christianity As the latest UK census figures show a steep decline in the number of those professing to be Christians, the challenge to believers must be to make known the gospel of Christ and to cry to God for his salvation. The number of people claiming to be Christian in England and Wales has declined by more than four million in the 10 years between the 2001 and 2011 censuses.     The number of Protestant Christians in Northern Ireland has also shrunk, as Catholicism, secularism and other beliefs take hold. In Belfast, the Catholics outnumber the Protestants. Figures relating to religion in Scotland...

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Marriage census tells it all

News

February 2013
News

Marriage census tells it all

Marriage census tells it all For the first time since records began, fewer than half the people of marriageable age in England and Wales are married and living together. Figures released in December 2012 from the findings of the 2011 census show that only 46.6 per cent of over-16s are currently married and living together, compared with 50.9 per cent at the 2001 census.     The extent of increasing family breakdown is demonstrated by the 2011 census finding that nearly 1.2 million people (2.6 per cent) are separated, and more than four million people (9 per cent) are divorced without having remarried.     The number...

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