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All articles by Roger Fay

Roger Fay was editor of Evangelical Times from 2007 until the end of 2018. He is a director of Evangelical Press Missionary Trust (Russian and French) and an elder of Zion Evangelical Baptist Church, Ripon

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Historical

March 2015
Articles > Historical

The forgotten John Wesley (2)

In October 1735 John Wesley was on board The Simmonds, bound for Savannah (see ET, February 2015). He was a fully fledged Anglican clergyman, and a missionary to Georgia, commissioned by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel.

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News

February 2015
News

Authentic Calvinism?

This was the title of December’s Westminster Conference, held in the comfortable premises of the Salvation Army’s Regent Hall, Oxford Street, London. This two-day conference is an opportunity for church leaders and others, men and women, to feast heart and mind on material both intellectually stimulating and spiritually edifying. The conference’s six papers are usually in church history and historical theology. They require much prior study and reflection from those who give them. Their benefits are enhanced by the 30-45 minutes discussion that follows each. This year, nearly 100 were in attendance. The papers were all of a good standard, although one speaker was so...

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Historical

February 2015
Articles > Historical

The forgotten John Wesley (1)

What sort of a person was John Wesley? He was about 5 feet 3 inches tall, slim, with piercing blue eyes, a fresh complexion and (when younger) auburn hair. He was careful about personal neatness and cleanliness. According to contemporary John Hampson, he wore ‘narrow plaited stock, a coat with a small upright collar’, but no knee buckles, silk or velvet. When preaching, he often wore his clerical gown and bands (neck-ware). Personality His temperament was one of ‘cheerfulness mingled with gravity, a sprightliness which was the natural result of an unusual flow of spirits and was yet combined with … the most serene tranquillity’....

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Two Thieves

Article

April 2014
Evangelistic

Two Thieves

‘Then one of the criminals who were hanged blasphemed [Jesus], saying, If you are the Christ, save yourself and us. But the other, answering, rebuked him, saying, Do you not even fear God, seeing you are under the same condemnation? And we indeed justly, for we receive the due reward of our deeds; but this man has done nothing wrong. Then he said to Jesus, Lord, remember me when you come into your kingdom. And Jesus said to him, Assuredly, I say to you, today you will be with me in paradise’ (Luke 23:39-43).   The two criminals crucified either side of Christ were not just...

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Samuel – God’s anchorman

Article

January 2014
Articles > Biblical/theological

Samuel – God’s anchorman

It’s only natural for Christians to take their role models from times of revival, but periods between revivals also provide deeply inspiring examples of God’s servants. In times of spiritual declension, one of the church’s greatest needs is for those who will stand as ‘pillars’ in (Galatians 2:9), or (to change the metaphor) serve as anchors for, a weak church. Samuel is a supreme Old Testament example of such a person. At various times prophet, priest and king (judge), he anticipated and adumbrated the roles of Messiah himself, at a time when Israel’s foundations were shaking. When Samuel arrived on the scene, Israel was on...

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Historical

October 2013
Articles > Historical

David Brainerd (1718-1747) (2)

Last month’s article on David Brainerd highlighted Jonathan Edwards’ esteem for his friend as an exemplar of authentic Christianity. Although dying when only 29, Brainerd was a classic role model for how the kingdom of God is extended. In 1729 Jonathan Edwards had become pastor at Northampton, Massachusetts, then a town of about 1000 men, women and children. During 1734-35, around one third of the town was converted within the short space of six months.     At that time, ‘a great and earnest concern about the great things of religion, and the eternal world, became universal in all parts of the town’, especially among the...

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David Brainerd (1718-1747)  (1)

Historical

September 2013
Articles > Historical

David Brainerd (1718-1747) (1)

There are compelling reasons why Christians should study the life of David Brainerd. First, this eighteenth century missionary to indigenous Americans (‘Red Indians’) was one of the greatest cross-cultural missionaries the world has ever seen. Although dying of tuberculosis at only 29 years old, he blazed a trail across succeeding generations of Reformed missionary work. Indeed, a powerful case can be made for his influence as seminal for the nineteenth century missionary movement. Second, his close friend and biographer, New England pastor Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758), is one of the greatest pastor-theologians of the last 300 years. Edwards thought Brainerd’s diary and journal worth presenting to...

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