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All articles by Roger Fay

Roger Fay was editor of Evangelical Times from 2007 until the end of 2018. He is a director of Evangelical Press Missionary Trust (Russian and French) and an elder of Zion Evangelical Baptist Church, Ripon

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June 2013
Articles > Biblical/theological

A nation in crisis

Arguments from silence can be risky, but Scripture uses such an argument with devastating effect in Judges 17 – 21.   The narratives in these five chapters show the covenant community of Israel in complete moral collapse. But the intriguing thing is that the historian allows the events to speak largely for themselves. There is no such comment as ‘the children of Israel did evil in the sight of the Lord’.      In the episode concerning Micah and the Danites (Judges 17 – 18), practically every commandment in the Decalogue is broken.      Take the Second Table: Micah dishonoured his mother (17:2); the Danites threatened...

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Westminster Conference 2012

News

February 2013
News

Westminster Conference 2012

Westminster Conference 2012 More than 100 Westminster Conference attendees enjoyed an intellectual and spiritual repast over 4-5 December. For the second year running, the conference met in the comfortable, conveniently situated premises of Regent Hall (Salvation Army), Oxford Street.     For 2012 the necessary focus was the Great Ejection of 1662 and issues flowing from it. The conference title ‘Truth at any cost’ helpfully captured the main spiritual lesson. As important today as then is the need to put truth and conscience above every other consideration.     Although the opening paper, ‘1662 and all that’, from Lee Gatiss challenged some traditional nonconformist understandings of the...

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William Carey, tongues and mission

Historical

February 2013
Articles > Historical

William Carey, tongues and mission

William Carey, tongues and mission On 28 October 1800, William Carey baptised his first Indian convert in the river at Serampore. This happy event took place seven years after Carey landed in India. Not surprisingly, Carey and his fellow missionaries were overjoyed. The convert was a high caste Brahmin Hindu, a 35-year-old man called Krishna Pal. He remained a faithful disciple of Jesus Christ to the end of his life. But William Carey, ‘the father of modern missions’, would never have embarked upon his epic missionary work if he had listened to some within his denomination, back in Northamptonshire. Confusion It is said that Baptist...

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The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (5)

Historical

September 2012
Articles > Historical

The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (5)

The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (5) Within the Clapham Sect’s united endeavours William Wilberforce’s contribution was outstanding. He was more than an eloquent and engaging parliamentary speaker with a melodious voice; he fired all the others in faith and fervour. He was, even for his day, small and slight in stature — ‘all soul and no body’ was one description of him. He was accessible to all kinds of people, maddeningly so in the opinion of his friends, who saw clearly enough that not all those soliciting his help were deserving of it.     Wilberforce He was highly sociable. Conversation...

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The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (4)

Historical

August 2012
Articles > Historical

The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (4)

The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (4) From the 1790s onwards, the Clapham Sect networked both inside and outside Parliament to bring about the end of Britain’s involvement in the slave trade. The Clapham Sect was largely comprised of wealthy, evangelical Anglican laymen, of whom the most famous was William Wilberforce.    By April 1792, the House of Commons had received an unprecedented 519 petitions for the abolition of the slave trade. The petition from Edinburgh was so long as to stretch the length of the Commons floor.     A widespread sugar boycott had also started. Thomas Clarkson observed there was no...

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The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (3)

Historical

July 2012
Articles > Historical

The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (3)

The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (3) The early English abolitionists faced fierce opposition from church and state. But they had set their course and, on 17 June 1783, the London Yearly Meeting of Quakers presented to Parliament the first ever petition against the slave trade. Following that, in 1787, a twelve-member Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade was established in London. Nine of its members were Quakers; the other three, including Granville Sharp and Thomas Clarkson, were Anglicans. Later, this committee sent every MP a copy of John Newton’s Thoughts upon the African slave trade. Enquiry    In 1788,...

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The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (2)

Historical

June 2012
Articles > Historical

The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (2)

The Clapham Sect and the abolition of the slave trade (2) John Wesley encouraged William Wilberforce that his fight against slavery was a ‘glorious enterprise’, but warned him that ‘unless God has raised you up for this very thing, you will be worn out by the opposition of men and devils’ (May ET). This month we look at the fierce opposition that the Clapham Sect faced. So institutionalised was the practice of slavery that the Claphamites reasoned that they could only end it by a two-step process.     They determined first upon abolishing the slave trade, as a means to the second step and greater...

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