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Son of the Underground

By Isaac Liu
September 2012 | Review by John Brand

Synopsis

In the months before Isaac's birth, his father was in prison once again. His mother was forced into having an abortion, though seven months pregnant, because she was carrying the child of an enemy of the state. After desperate prayer, the night before she was due to go into hospital for the operation, she miraculously gave birth. Isaac met his father for the first time at the age of four. Brother Yun was constantly on the run, and his mother had to work to feed the family, so his grandmother cared for him. One day his mother was also arrested. Isaac and his sister were swiftly taken to another town by local Christians, where they registered at a school under false names. The family finally managed to flee to Burma, Thailand and ultimately Germany. As he grew up, what should Isaac do? Isaac's mother had prayed that God would not call her son to be an evangelist - but his father had dedicated him to God. Isaac, now in his twenties, has embraced the call to be a pastor.

  • Publisher: Monarch - Lion Hudson
  • ISBN: 978-0-85721-199-6
  • Pages: 144
  • Price: 6.99
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Book Review

Son of the Underground
Isaac Liu
Monarch – Lion Hudson
144, £6.99
ISBN: 978-0-85721-199-6
Star Rating: 2

Isaac Liu is the son of ‘The Heavenly Man’ whose story caused quite a stir and not a little controversy several years ago.  Now, Isaac tells his own story of being brought up in a home from which his father was absent for long periods of time because he was either in prison or on the run to avoid arrest.  In fact he didn’t meet his father until he was four and only knew him from a wanted poster.  There are some interesting insights about the life and witness of the underground church in China during these years of repression and then Liu recounts the family’s dramatic and daring escape to Burma and on to Germany where he enrolled in a Bible school.

It’s an interesting enough story which could have been improved with some better editing, but I am always a bit sceptical when someone as young as Liu is, just 28, writes a life story and I can’t help wondering whether the story would have been written and published were he not his father’s son.

John Brand

Edinburgh

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