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A Pilgrim Path: John Bunyan’s Journey

By Faith Cook
April 2018 | Review by Simoney Kyriakou
  • Publisher: Evangelical Press
  • ISBN: 978-1-78397-213-5
  • Pages: 188
  • Price: £8.99
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Book Review

John Bunyan is no stranger to Christians and his book Pilgrim’s progress, written in 1678, is well-known and well loved by those of Christian faith and those with none.

Neither is Bunyan a stranger to Faith Cook, whose 2008 book Fearless pilgrim: the life and times of John Bunyan is an in-depth, well researched volume, going into great historical detail about the tinker-turned-teacher of the gospel.

Some might consider A pilgrim path — a thinner version of the 2008 book — to be a lesser work, but Faith Cook here has not set out to provide a comprehensive historical narrative, but a compendious version with a strong evangelistic aim.

A pilgrim path aims to explain the reasons behind the decisions made by Bunyan and the sense of God’s calling on his life. By so doing — and at times introducing speculative conjecture as to the motives and feelings of him and his family — Faith Cook invites the reader to engage with Bunyan on a spiritual level.

Whether you are a first-time reader of Christian biography, a new Christian seeking encouragement or an earnest seeker after truth, this book will encourage and enlighten.

If you are looking for the one, definitive biography of Bunyan, this is not perhaps the book for you. But as a reminder of the reason for our faith, it will definitely rekindle cold hearts. For those looking for something to give evangelistically, this is a good starting point, clearly stating the need for salvation and the search for scriptural assurance.

It is also written in Faith Cook’s usual, clear, unassuming voice, which makes it an easy read for young people and for those who rarely find the time to dive into Christian literature. A good four-hour train journey should suffice for an enjoyable read from beginning to end!

Simoney Kyriakou

Carshalton

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