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#TBH: Basic Challenges to Millennials Who Can’t Even

By Regan Blanton King
May 2019 | Review by Tom Allen
  • Publisher: Abbott Press
  • ISBN: 978-1-45822-159-9
  • Pages: 110
  • Price: £7.95
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This book provides a balanced and biblical remedy to the issues that characterise the millennial generation (loosely defined as those people who reached adulthood in the twenty-first century). As well as challenging any readers born into that category, the book would also benefit believers seeking to evangelise that young generation. It will help them understand their worldview, their attitudes, their difficulties and how the word of God addresses them.

Regan King doesn’t pull any punches when dealing with traits of millennials. Much of his analysis is spot on, much needed and readily identifiable. As a millennial myself, I was also challenged. It helped me see the areas where I have adopted some of the sinful attitudes that characterise my generation.

A few stand-out points were as follows. There is a tendency among millennials to view faith as a solely individualistic endeavour. They are often reluctant to submit themselves to the authoritative teaching of the local church: it’s all about their personal ‘relationship with Jesus’.

King refutes this argument by stating that Christianity is a religion (James 1:26-27): ‘the worship of a personal God, a system of faith and worship and a devotion to such a life of worship’ (p.2). In other words millennials need to realise that they are not the authority in matters of faith and practice, but God and his word are.

#TBH goes on to challenge the millennial instinct to view objective standards as negative, restrictive and harmful. Indeed, millennials often think that freedom is found outside of established patterns of right and wrong. King helpfully brings out the fact that God defines right and wrong, that we are saved in order that we would obey, and that in so doing we discover the freedom of following God’s good and wise commandments.

Other issues are dealt with well. For example, my generation’s general ignorance of history, disregard of aged wisdom, desire to question everything that they have inherited and the sense of entitlement which results in a lack of commitment when the going gets tough. The book is biblically robust in addressing these issues.

However, there were times when the tone of the book became rather confrontational. At one point it is a bit flippant, reporting blasphemous words and implying certain swear words, leaving your imagination to fill the blank. I found this unnecessary in order to make the point. For me, it was a stumbling block. There were also a few places where I felt a point did not lead on logically from the last due to the punchy nature of the book. That said, reading the book was a blessing and I recommend it.

Tom Allen

Belvedere

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