Subscribe now

How the Bible Can Change Your Life: Answers to the Ten Most Common Questions about the Bible

By Josh Moody
February 2019 | Review by Patrick Buckley
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • ISBN: 978-1-5271-0151-7
  • Pages: 128
  • Price: £4.99
Buy this book »

Book Review

This book started as a series of sermons preached at Wheaton Chapel in which Pastor Moody aimed to answer questions about the Bible.

I appreciated Moody’s aim in addressing these questions. His points were often fresh, illuminating and helpful. One example is his discussion of the relevance of the Bible. He highlights the common but mistaken view that unless what is read is immediately useful it is unhelpful. Moody points out that this attitude is a consumerist approach to the Bible and cannot address the deepest needs of the human heart.

‘Is the Bible interesting?’ is a further issue that is well addressed. Moody demonstrates that the Bible’s attraction lies not in whether it tickles one’s fancy but whether one sees it as food or not.

Other chapters deal with various topics: biblical authority; when the Bible should be read; and what it has to say to our culture about questions of human sexuality. Even if not original, Moody’s points are worthy and well put.

I do have reservations in commending this volume wholeheartedly.

Firstly, Moody twice implies that the Genesis creation account may accommodate evolution. He says, in effect, that the jury is still out on this matter — quoting with approval Augustine, who said the historicity of Genesis 1 is not important. I think the matter of the historicity of Genesis 1 is critical for a clear understanding of the gospel.

Secondly, each chapter ends with a somewhat contrived and unnatural story, albeit intended to reinforce the point of the chapter.

Thirdly, at times the book read more like mere sermon transcriptions rather than a fully edited draft for written publication.

Patrick Buckley

Truro

Tags:
Bible

Book Reviews

Read our latest book reviews

Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
Rowland Hill – The second Whitefield
Tim Shenton

‘There are three men, who are the most powerful preachers that England has ever produced, and yet only two of them [Whitefield and Spurgeon] are well known.’ As its opening words imply (p.7), this book’s aim is to present the…

See all book reviews
Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
Pray Big: Learn to Pray Like an Apostle
Alistair Begg

Of the making of books on prayer there seems to be no end. That fact probably reflects the need that almost of all of us feel for more help in this vitally important area of our Christian lives The problem,…

Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
FILM REVIEW: Matthew Henry — The life and times of the Bible commentator
Dan Pugh

Although the name of Matthew Henry has become synonymous with the whole-Bible commentary which he authored in the early 18th century, there is also much to learn from his remarkable life and the tumultuous times through which he lived. This…

Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
Ephesians (Tyndale New Testament Commentary)
Darrell L Bock

Whenever a new commentary is published from the conservative viewpoint on a book of the Bible which is already well covered, there ought to be few issues of concern because there is so much literature with which to compare it.…