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How the Bible Can Change Your Life: Answers to the Ten Most Common Questions about the Bible

By Josh Moody
February 2019 | Review by Patrick Buckley
  • Publisher: Christian Focus
  • ISBN: 978-1-5271-0151-7
  • Pages: 128
  • Price: £4.99
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This book started as a series of sermons preached at Wheaton Chapel in which Pastor Moody aimed to answer questions about the Bible.

I appreciated Moody’s aim in addressing these questions. His points were often fresh, illuminating and helpful. One example is his discussion of the relevance of the Bible. He highlights the common but mistaken view that unless what is read is immediately useful it is unhelpful. Moody points out that this attitude is a consumerist approach to the Bible and cannot address the deepest needs of the human heart.

‘Is the Bible interesting?’ is a further issue that is well addressed. Moody demonstrates that the Bible’s attraction lies not in whether it tickles one’s fancy but whether one sees it as food or not.

Other chapters deal with various topics: biblical authority; when the Bible should be read; and what it has to say to our culture about questions of human sexuality. Even if not original, Moody’s points are worthy and well put.

I do have reservations in commending this volume wholeheartedly.

Firstly, Moody twice implies that the Genesis creation account may accommodate evolution. He says, in effect, that the jury is still out on this matter — quoting with approval Augustine, who said the historicity of Genesis 1 is not important. I think the matter of the historicity of Genesis 1 is critical for a clear understanding of the gospel.

Secondly, each chapter ends with a somewhat contrived and unnatural story, albeit intended to reinforce the point of the chapter.

Thirdly, at times the book read more like mere sermon transcriptions rather than a fully edited draft for written publication.

Patrick Buckley

Truro

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