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All articles in category Historical

Historical

March 2016
Articles > Historical

King Edward VI

Edward VI, Henry VIII’s only son, was crowned king at the age of 9, but died at the age of 15. He was a gifted young man and convinced evangelical, who, despite his short life, has impacted our national life down to modern times. On 27 January 1547, Henry VIII knew he was near…

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Historical

March 2016
Articles > Historical

Victorian Christianity’s flight from faith (1)

Robust evangelical belief, whether Calvinist or Arminian, fell into rapid decay during the Victorian and Edwardian eras. It has been customary to fix the largest part of the blame for this on Charles Darwin (1809-1882) and his speculations. Although Darwin’s writings were a significant contributory factor, in reality, decline set in years before his…

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Historical

March 2016
Articles > Historical

Prophet of the long road: the life and ministry of Francis Asbury

In October 1924, Calvin Coolidge, the 30th President of the United States, spoke at the dedication, in Washington DC, of a statue of a lowly Methodist preacher seated upon his horse. The pose of the horse, with its head swung downwards and licking its knee, was quite an unusual one for an equestrian statue.…

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Historical

February 2016
Articles > Historical

Jonathan Edwards: missionary to the Indians

On a wintry Lord’s Day in January 1751, in the frontier village of Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Jonathan Edwards preached one of his first sermons as a prospective missionary to the Mohawk and Mohican Indians. Edwards made a connection between the biblical narrative and the situation unfolding before him, not only for his Native American Indian…

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Historical

February 2016
Articles > Historical

John Berridge (1716 – 1793)

John Berridge was born 300 years ago this month. The article below is edited from C. H. Spurgeon’s interesting and entertaining book Eccentric preachers. John Berridge, the Vicar of Everton, was commended by John Wesley as one of the most simple as well as most sensible of all whom it pleased God to employ…

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Historical

January 2016
Articles > Historical

Richard Baxter of Kidderminster (2)

Although Richard Baxter was a chaplain in Cromwell’s Model Army (Continued from ET, November 2015), he was at heart a Royalist. At Coventry he declared his allegiance to the parliamentary cause, but later said that he was sorry he had done so and wrote a 32 point apology for it! He gave as a reason…

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Historical

December 2015
Articles > Historical

The surprising story of Colonel James Gardiner (1688-1745)

Commemorations of the defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 have grabbed many headlines this year, as we celebrated the 200th anniversary of that historic victory by the Duke of Wellington’s forces. Hailed among the finest of all British military commanders, Wellington has often been compared with the Duke of Marlborough,…

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Historical

December 2015
Articles > Historical

Foundling tokens

Lying a little to the south of London’s three great railway stations for the north (Euston, St Pancras and King’s Cross) is the Foundling Museum. Once home to the capital’s abandoned children, it contains dozens of wooden trays each containing hundreds and hundreds of little tokens. Many more are stored away. And each one…

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Historical

November 2015
Articles > Historical

Catherine Parr (1512–1548)

Catherine Parr, the sixth and last wife of Henry VIII, played an important role in the lives of many key figures in the English Reformation. She was born in c.1512 into a minor aristocratic family, some three years after Henry VIII had married his first wife Catherine of Aragon. Her father died when she…

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Historical

November 2015
Articles > Historical

Richard Baxter of Kidderminster (1)

Richard Baxter was born 400 years ago, on 12 November 1615, at Rowton in Shropshire. He was educated at a number of places — Ludlow Castle, Eton Constantine, Donnington and Great Wroxeter. His father was a member of the Shropshire gentry who in early life gambled away his inheritance, but just before Richard’s birth…

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Historical

October 2015
Articles > Historical

John Owen (1616–1683)

John Owen, perhaps the greatest of the Puritan theologians, was born sometime in 1616 — 400 years ago, next year — to a family of Puritans living in the tiny village of Stadhampton, in Oxfordshire. The family was not especially wealthy, and neither were they especially rigorous in their religious views. Owen later described…

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Historical

September 2015
Articles > Historical

Thomas Cranmer (1489-1556)

Thomas Cranmer, one of the Reformation’s most famous martyrs, can accurately be described as the architect of the Church of England, and consequently of the worldwide Anglican communion. Despite this, considerably less has been written about him than other key figures of the Reformation. Born in humble circumstances in 1489 in Aslockton, Nottinghamshire, he…

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