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All articles in category Historical

Memories of Duncan Campbell
January 2012
Articles > Historical

Memories of Duncan Campbell

Memories of Duncan Campbell The name Duncan Campbell is always associated with the remarkable revival that occurred in the Isle of Lewis, off the west coast of Scotland, from 1949 to 1952. Those truly were glorious and wonderful days, when the community was saturated with the presence and power of God. There are scores of amazing stories that you can read for yourself in the books that are available.    Many people were saved through the ministry of Duncan Campbell — not only during the revival, but also during the years beforehand and those that followed. Duncan was an evangelist. He preached and people were saved...

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The hymns of Charles Wesley
January 2012
Articles > Historical

The hymns of Charles Wesley

The hymns of Charles Wesley The Charles Wesley hymns that we find in our current hymnbooks and other sources are so popular, especially when set to rousing tunes, that it is hard to understand why so few are in current use. There does appear to be some misunderstanding among producers of modern songbooks. It is thought that, unless hymns are in modern idiom, they will not appeal to young people.     Tunes This may be true of hymns in which the words lack fire, especially when set to dirgy tunes, but Wesley hymns are a great exception. Many young people are surprised when they enter...

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One hundred years ago
December 2011
Historical but excluded from the Timeline

One hundred years ago

John Harper glanced at the ticket he had just purchased — No. 248727. It had cost a handsome £33 — a considerable sum for a Baptist pastor to pay in 1912. Originally, Harper had planned to sail to New York on the Lusitania, en route to Chicago, where he was booked to preach at the Moody Church for three months. De­layed by a change in arrangements, he had decided to travel on the Titanic instead. The largest and most luxurious liner afloat and newly launched from the Harland and Wolff Belfast shipyard, the Titanic was about to embark on her maiden voyage. ‘Not even God...

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One hundred years ago…
December 2011
Articles > Historical

One hundred years ago…

One hundred years ago… John Harper glanced at the ticket he had just purchased — No. 248727. It had cost a handsome £33 — a considerable sum for a Baptist pastor to pay in 1912. Originally, Harper had planned to sail to New York on the Lusitania, en route to Chicago, where he was booked to preach at the Moody Church for three months. Delayed by a change in arrangements, he had decided to travel on the Titanic instead.    The largest and most luxurious liner afloat and newly launched from the Harland and Wolff Belfast shipyard, the Titanic was about to embark on her maiden...

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Samuel Rutherford
November 2011
Articles > Historical

Samuel Rutherford

Samuel Rutherford A seventeenth-century Englishman once listened to some well-known preachers in Scotland. Of them he said, ‘I came to Irvine, and heard a well-favoured, proper old man, with a long beard, and that man [David Dickson] showed me all my heart. Then I went to St Andrews, where I heard a sweet, majestic looking man [Robert Blair], and he showed me the majesty of God. After him I heard a little, fair man, and he showed me the loveliness of Christ’. The ‘little, fair man’ was Samuel Rutherford, whose influence lingers on today, particularly through his published Letters.       Rutherford was born 411 years ago...

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The Rev. John Eddison (1916-2011)
November 2011
Articles > Historical

The Rev. John Eddison (1916-2011)

The Rev. John Eddison (1916-2011) Robert John Buchanan Eddison was born in the middle of World War 1, the son of the Rev. F. W. Eddison who ten years before had been domestic chaplain to Handley Moule, Bishop of Durham. As a boy at Wellington College, Berkshire, John was a school prefect and a fast bowler in the Cricket XI. He also ran a Christian Union, which attracted some 70 boys to talks and Bible studies. He followed his father to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he read history, and went on to train for ordination at Ridley Hall, Cambridge.     Meanwhile he had become a...

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T. C. Hammond (1877-1961)
November 2011
Articles > Historical

T. C. Hammond (1877-1961)

T. C. Hammond (1877-1961) At the age of 13 he started work as a railway clerk in Cork, Ireland. Forty-six years later he became an outstanding principal of Moore Theological College, Sydney, Australia. But there is much more to the remarkable life of T. C. Hammond. ‘Tommy’ Hammond was born into a Protestant family in Cork in 1877. His father died when he was only six years old. In those days women did not attend funerals, so he was put into a carriage and went on his own. Around the time he began work, he joined the newly formed YMCA in Cork. This met originally...

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The Colloquy of Poissy
November 2011
Articles > Historical

The Colloquy of Poissy

The Colloquy of Poissy Over the weekend of 10-11 September 2011, the town of Poissy, near Paris, commemorated the first official ecumenical debate to be held in France — 450 years ago. It is called the Colloquy of Poissy and was a debate between Roman Catholics and Protestants lasting from 9 September to 14 October 1561. The colloquy was convened by the Catholic Queen Regent, Catherine de Médecis, in the reign of her young son, Charles IX. Catherine has left on record her reason for this attempt at religious reconciliation. In a letter addressed to the French ambassador in Spain, she suggested that they should...

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