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All articles in category Historical

The Marian Martyrs

Historical

April 2005
Articles > Historical

The Marian Martyrs

Bishop John Hooper, who died at the stake in Gloucester on 9 February 1555, was one of the early Marian martyrs. His close personal involvement in the Protestantism of the Continent made a distinctive contribution to English church life. His death in the city where he once ministered must have made a deep impression…

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Polycarp

Historical

April 2005
Articles > Historical

Polycarp

A church meeting is taking place in Smyrna. A resolution is passed. For the annual church outing we shall go to the local cemetery. Last February the church had lost its beloved pastor - Polycarp had died a martyr at the hands of the persecuting Roman authority. Now the congregation decides to meet at…

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Hudson Taylor

Historical

March 2005
Articles > Historical

Hudson Taylor

Part 2 – part 1 is here 2. Reaping in joy by Jonathan Bayes Hudson Taylor landed at Shanghai on 1 March 1854. He quickly discovered that the missionary society that had brought him to China was incompetent. No accommodation had been arranged, finances were inadequate and planning was a shambles. Worst of all,…

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The Marian martyrs

Historical

March 2005
Articles > Historical

The Marian martyrs

1. John Rogers and the persecution Four hundred and fifty years ago on 4 February 1555 John Rogers was tied to a post in Smithfield, London, firewood was heaped around him and he was burned to death — because he was an evangelical Christian.   In the next three and a half years nearly…

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Hudson Taylor (1832-1905)

Historical

February 2005
Articles > Historical

Hudson Taylor (1832-1905)

Part 1 of 2 parts Part 2 is here God so loved the world ‘There will be a story at the commencement, and a sermon or moral at the close. I will take the former and leave the latter for those who like it’. So said Hudson Taylor to himself one June afternoon in…

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Would Bernard of Clairvaux have gone to my church?

Historical

January 2005
Articles > Historical

Would Bernard of Clairvaux have gone to my church?

We who call ourselves 'evangelical' like to identify great men of the past and perhaps think, 'he would have gone to my church'. Charles Spurgeon, for example - if he hadn't been the 'prince of preachers' in a former age, I'm sure he would have gone to my church.If George Whitefield hadn't have been…

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Historical

January 2005
Articles > Historical

Surprising conversions

A correspondent writes:I enjoyed the story of penicillin in the article 'Does God perform miracles today?' by Prof. Rendle-Short in the October 2004 issues of ET. Given that the doctrine of God's sovereign election - diligently promoted by the editors of ET - implies that every conversion of a soul to Christ is a…

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Genius at Work – James Clerk Maxwell

Historical

December 2004
Articles > Historical

Genius at Work – James Clerk Maxwell

The family house in Edinburgh was a very strange place. Almost everything in it was designed by 'father' - a mildly eccentric barrister with a passion for mechanical things and an amazingly inventive mind.Not long after the birth of James Clerk Maxwellin 1831, his father took it into his head to design a new…

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Augustine: Vessel and champion of grace

Historical

November 2004
Articles > Historical

Augustine: Vessel and champion of grace

Here's an interesting question - why should a 21st century Evangelical learn theology from a 5th century African bishop? The answer is that the bishop knew more about God’s grace, both theologically and in his spiritual experience, than many of us. The bishop is of course Augustine of Hippo, the early Church Father whose…

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Does God perform miracles today?The story of penicillin (part 2)

Historical

November 2004
Articles > Historical

Does God perform miracles today?The story of penicillin (part 2)

Last month we saw that the discovery of penicillin (and thus of antibiotics generally) involved what Professor R. G. Macfarlane has called an 'incalculably large series of coincidents'. Let us now summarise these.1. The way in which the special mould got into Fleming’s laboratory and onto a Petrie dish loaded with staphylococci bacteria (staphs)…

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The conversion of Arthur Pink : Part 2. Appointment with God

Historical

November 2004
Articles > Historical

The conversion of Arthur Pink : Part 2. Appointment with God

What drew Pink to theosophy is unknown. Perhaps, as in the case of others, it was the society's claim to experience occult phenomena, and certainly their practices were allied to spiritualism. In a later address on the subject Pink spoke of spiritualism (belief in communication with the spirit of the dead) as the ‘pioneer’…

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The conversion of Arthur Pink – Part 1 – Early years

Historical

October 2004
Articles > Historical

The conversion of Arthur Pink – Part 1 – Early years

Arthur Walkington Pink was born on 1 April 1886 - in Nottingham beside the River Trent and in what was then accounted 'the richest country of the world'. Queen Victoria had reigned over a rising prosperity for half a century, and the government of Robert Cecil, third marquis of Salisbury, ruled a quarter of…

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