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All articles in category Historical

Historical

September 1998
Articles > Historical

Don Jorge

Who was George Borrow? You would not have asked that question a hundred and fifty years ago, for then the author of The Bible in Spain, Lavengro (Word-Master), The Romany Rye (Gipsy Gentleman), not to mention Romano Lavo-Lil (Gipsy Dictionary), was as famous as Charles Dickens. For generations George Borrow, also known as ‘Don…

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Historical

September 1998
Articles > Historical

The Edict of Nantes

World Cup fever is just about over. Like most of the nation I followed the fortunes of Glen Hoddle’s men with great enthusiasm, but I was also intrigued to know that their base camp for the competition was at Nantes. Perhaps this ancient city had only a passing concern for most fans, but, for…

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Historical

September 1998
Articles > Historical

Andrew Fuller and the Sandemanians

In December 1967, Dr Martyn Lloyd-Jones gave an address to what was then known as the Puritan Conference on the topic of ‘Sandemanianism’. Our initial reaction might be that the topic is esoteric, of little interest or value to modern men and women. But we would not feel this way if we were well-versed…

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Historical

September 1998
Articles > Historical

Cyril Lucaris (1572-1638)

June 1998 was the 360th anniversary of the death of Cyril Lucaris (Greek: Kyrillos Loukaris), Patriarch of Constantinople. However, there was no celebration regarding his life and contribution to the faith among the three hundred million Orthodox people in the world today. He was, after all, a heretic. Lucaris was born on 13 November…

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Historical

August 1998
Articles > Historical

Colonel James Gardiner

James Gardiner was born near Edinburgh in 1688. His pious mother and aunt instructed him in the Christian faith but no impression was made upon him. He lived for adventure and later for illicit romance. At the age of twelve he joined the army and two years later was fighting in Holland under Marlborough.…

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Historical

August 1998
Articles > Historical

Antoine Court and the ‘French Prophets’

In last month's article on notable defenders of the Christian faith, I wrote about the progress of the Reformed faith in France after the time of the Reformation. During the mid-sixteenth century there was great advance, as French evangelists (many of them sent out from John Calvin's academy in Geneva) sought to plant churches…

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Historical

July 1998
Articles > Historical

A Reformed Opponent of Early Arminianism

The marvellous story of the French Calvinists after the time of John Calvin, those men and women known to history as the Huguenots, is barely known today. They include such strong Reformed believers as Admiral Gaspard de Coligny (1519-1572), Jean-Baptiste Morelli, Jean Claude (1619-1687), and Claude Brousson (1647-1698). Their names are rarely heard in…

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Historical

July 1998
Articles > Historical

The faith of George Müller

If you have ever watched the BBC's Casualty series, you have seen George Müller's orphan houses on Ashley Down in Bristol, where the series was filmed. They are impressive buildings, especially as no fund-raising for them was ever undertaken. During the course of his life, George Müller raised around £1,400,000 without ever asking anybody…

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Historical

June 1998
Articles > Historical

The Significance of Savonarola

Five hundred years after his death, Savonarola remains an enigma. From his early years he felt intensely the sins of society. His ministry was marked by an extraordinary, almost fanatical, zeal. He preached fearlessly against the ungodliness of a church oiled by money and administered by grasping clerics. He was not afraid to identify…

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Historical

June 1998
Articles > Historical

The Hound of God – Girolamo Savonarola (1452-1498)

Domini Canes - the hounds of God - was a Tuscan pun on 'Dominicans', the order to which Girolamo Savonarola belonged. The idea is represented in a fresco painted for the Dominicans by Simone Memmi. Savonarola made it his life's aim to protect the church of Christ from the corruption in the world, as…

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Historical

June 1998
Articles > Historical

John Calvin and the ‘Delusive Pretentions’ of Rome

John Calvin (1509-1564) -or, to give him his French name, Jean Calvin - was the most self-effacing of the Reformers. Yet it was this constitutionally shy man who the Lord saw fit to use to rebut the 'delusive pretensions' of the Roman Church and establish the Reformed faith on a firm foundation in western…

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Historical

May 1998
Articles > Historical

Defenders of the faith – Basil of Caesarea and the deity of the Holy Spirit

While the first book devoted to the subject of baptism was written by the North African theologian, Tertullian, at the end of the second century AD, it was not until the middle of the ninth century that a book on the Lord’s Supper appeared. Similarly, while there were a number of books on the…

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