Subscribe now

All articles in category Nepal

January 2017
DESC

Nepal’s most unlikely church planter (2)

The outcast — ‘hated by his gods’, despised by his village, a disgrace to his family — was now embraced by Jesus Christ (see ET, December 2016). His reputation as a thug was infamous, and rumours of his transformative conversion spread quickly. Suraj’s mother could not believe the change. She wanted to meet the pastor of the church to tell him, ‘My son was dead, you made him alive’: words of high praise from an orthodox Hindu woman with a lifelong suspicion of ‘cow-eaters’ [Christians]. ‘The despair I felt in my life before Christ, all those suicidal thoughts, were replaced by a joy and delight...

Read more
December 2016
DESC

Nepal’s most unlikely church-planter (1)

Down the valley from Kathmandu, the ancient capital of Nepal, rests an even older city. In Bhaktapur, the timeworn traditions of Hinduism sink as deep into the dry soil as the white-capped Himalayan mountains rise in the background. Bhaktapur looks like it was built one brick at a time. Narrow, brick-paved city streets are lined on both sides by three-story brick buildings, built into each other over time to become a continuous wall of homes and stores. An occasional small tractor or motorcycle putters slowly by, joined for a few steps by a wandering goat or chicken or dog. Delivery men on bicycles snake through...

Read more
Missionary Spotlight-Christ in the Himalayas
January 2005
DESC

Missionary Spotlight-Christ in the Himalayas

Undoubtedly, the most significant story in the Nepali church of the last 20 years is the movement to Christ of a large number of Tamangs. The Tamang people live mostly in hill districts surrounding the Kathmandu valley. Speaking a pair of related languages, they are thought to have originated from Tibet and migrated into their present heartland many centuries ago. Tamang villages are inhabited by up to 4,000 people, who scratch a living from the hillsides, between about 4,000 and 10,000ft above sea level. The movement of Tamangs to Christ can be traced back to two significant events in the 1960s. In one, the arrival...

Read more
Missionary Spotlight-Church growth
January 2005
DESC

Missionary Spotlight-Church growth

Just over 50 years ago a Nepali Brahman and his family walked across the border from India up into the hills – to return to the house and land they had abandoned a decade before because of a smallpox epidemic. While in India, Buddhi Sagar had met an evangelist by the name of David Mukhia, himself a Nepali, and had come to Christ through his witness. David Mukhia later joined Buddhi Sagar and a small fellowship was begun. From such humble beginnings, today’s church in Nepal has grown in an astonishing way. Missionaries from India and a host of other countries entered Nepal and have...

Read more
Missionary Spotlight
January 2005
DESC

Missionary Spotlight

Scaling mountains in Nepal Until 1940 Christianity was prohibited in Nepal. But in 1950 Nepali Christians living in Darjeeling, north-east India, brought the gospel into the country and won a few people for Christ. A number of other Christian missions were active from that time, including the International Nepal Fellowship (formerly Nepal Evangelistic Band) and the United Mission to Nepal. These societies established mission hospitals and schools, and did much good. Churches   The first Evangelical church was established in 1952 — at Ramghat in Pokhara. Other churches were planted at Putali Sadak in 1956 and at Gyaneshwar in 1957. But when a law prohibiting...

Read more
January 2005
DESC

Missionary Spotlight-The power of the Word

The narrator is one of three Tamang men whose ministries the Lord has blessed to their fellow people. As there is official opposition to Christians in Nepal this narrative preserves the anonymity of those concerned. In 1967 two women Bible translators arrived from Australia and travelled to my district. They asked the Chief District Officer (CDO) where there might be people who speak good Tamang. He pointed them to our village, and they met our village headman. The headman told me I should work with them to teach them Tamang, as I had a little English and was educated. At that time neither I nor...

Read more