Subscribe now

World Mission

New Zealand

Basic info

  • Area: 268,838 sq km
  • Population: 4,510,327
  • Infant mortality: 4.4 deaths/1,000 live births
  • Life expectancy: 81.3 years
  • Urbanisation: 86.5% of total population
  • Literacy: 99%

History

The Polynesian Maori reached New Zealand sometime between A.D. 1250 and 1300. In 1840, their chieftains entered into a compact with Britain, the Treaty of Waitangi, in which they ceded sovereignty to Queen Victoria while retaining territorial rights. That same year, the British began the first organized colonial settlement. A series of land wars between 1843 and 1872 ended with the defeat of the native peoples. The British colony of New Zealand became an independent dominion in 1907 and supported the UK militarily in both world wars. New Zealand's full participation in a number of defense alliances lapsed by the 1980s. In recent years, the government has sought to address longstanding Maori grievances.

Environment

The climate is temperate with sharp regional contrasts, and the terrain is predominately mountainous with large coastal plains.

Economy

Over the past 40 years, the government has transformed New Zealand from an agrarian economy, dependent on concessionary British market access, to a more industrialized, free market economy that can compete globally. This dynamic growth has boosted real incomes, but left behind some at the bottom of the ladder and broadened and deepened the technological capabilities of the industrial sector. Per capita income rose for 10 consecutive years until 2007 in purchasing power parity terms, but fell in 2008-09. Debt-driven consumer spending drove robust growth in the first half of the decade, fuelling a large balance of payments deficit that posed a challenge for policymakers. Inflationary pressures caused the central bank to raise its key rate steadily from January 2004 until it was among the highest in the OECD in 2007 and 2008. The higher rate attracted international capital inflows, which strengthened the currency and housing market while aggravating the current account deficit. Rising house prices, especially in Auckland, have become a political issue in recent years, as well as a policy challenge in 2016 and 2017, as the ability to afford housing has declined for many. Expanding New Zealand’s network of free trade agreements remains a top foreign policy priority. New Zealand was an early promoter of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and was the second country to ratify the agreement in May 2017. Following the United States’ withdrawal from the TPP in January 2017, on 10 November 2017 the remaining 11 countries agreed on the core elements of a modified agreement, which they renamed the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). In November 2016, New Zealand opened negotiations to upgrade its FTA with China; China is one of New Zealand’s most important trading partners.

Ethnic groups

Ethnic Groups(%)

European

71.2

Maori

14.1

Asian

11.3

Pacific peoples

7.6

other

1.6

African

1.1

Religion

Religion(%)

Catholic

11.6

Anglican

10.8

Christian

9.9

Presbyterian and Congregational

7.8

Methodist

2.4

Hindu

2.1

Pentecostal

1.8

Buddhist

1.4

Languages

  • 89.8%

    English (de facto official)

  • 3.5%

    Maori (de jure official)

  • 2%

    Samoan

  • 1.6%

    Hindi

  • 1.2%

    French

  • 1.2%

    Northern Chinese