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All articles from issue September 2019

Event

September 2019

Death

Wycliffe died of natural causes at the age of 64. After his death, Wycliffe was declared a heretic by the Roman Catholic Church in 1415, banning his publications and ordering his remains to be burned, an order carried out in 1528.

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Event

September 2019

Wycliffe’s supporters – ‘Lollards’ – spread his teachings

Laymen began preaching Wycliffe’s ideas in English. They were derided as mumblers (‘Lollards’) by opponents.

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Event

September 2019

Publishes against transubstantiation

At Oxford, Wycliffe published 12 Theses for debate, criticising the Roman Catholic teaching of transubstantiation. The first thesis included: “The consecrated host which we see upon the altar is neither Christ nor any part of Christ, but an efficacious sign of him.” His radical views received widespread condmenation, but none would debate him. He…

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Event

September 2019

Oversees translation of the Latin Vulgate Bible into Middle English

Wycliffe himself translated the New Testament into a language the common people of England could understand. The Old Testament was translated by Wycliffe’s associates. In a time prior to the printing press, copies had to be made by hand.

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Event

September 2019

Black Death sweeps England

It is estimated that 30% – 40% of the population of England died. A later biographer of Wycliffe said that he was profoundly affected and troubled by the catastrophe and that thenceforth he had, “Very gloomy views in regard to the condition and prospects of the human race.” Three more outbreaks ocurred in Wycliffe’s…

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Event

September 2019

Pope Gregory XI issues bulls against Wycliffe

Wycliffe’s ongoing criticism and denunciation of the papacy’s claims and practices incurred the ire of Rome.

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Event

September 2019

Appears in papal court to answer for his teaching

Wycliffe had openly denounced what he viewed as the unwarranted power and wealth of the Roman Catholic clergy. The hearing took place before William Courtenay, Bishop of London, in St Paul’s Cathedral. Because of scuffles between supporters of Wycliffe and his opponents, the assembly broke up before the reformer could be formally examined.

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