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London Theological Seminary

August 2011 | by Gary Brady

London Theological Seminary

On the last Saturday in June, London Theological Seminary (LTS) held its end of year thanksgiving service at Kensit Evangelical Church, in Finchley.
    The chairman, Bill James from Leamington Spa, presided over the event, which, along with prayer, Scripture reading and hymns, included the three traditional components of this annual event — report, interviews and sermon.
    The report was given by Principal Robert Strivens. Though positive, it reflected on the need for more UK students and flagged the continuing difficulties with visas that bringing in overseas students now involves.
    As Mr Strivens observed, the need for pastors and church planters is greater than the supply. LTS is only one agency that seeks to remedy this — if only there were more students.
    Interviews with leaving students were conducted by Vice-Principal David Green. There were only six this year, as some have opted for the new third-year LTS course.
    Benjamin Mallari is from the Philippines and Uma Kanta Sharma from Nepal. Both are heading home to carry on their ministries. Brian Pe Kee may spend another year studying in Britain, but will eventually return to Myanmar to carry on his work.
    Pascal Rivoire has a Swiss, German and Argentine background and is planning to be involved in ministry in Germany. Both UK students, Darren Graham and George Platt, are unsure of the future, but we pray that they will know God’s leading.
    One interesting sidelight was the role that Google played for students in locating LTS in the first place. The seminary is much awake to the changing world. The modular course that several students take, attending just one or two days a week, is an example of its flexible approach.
    Thirdly there was the sermon, and what a blessing it was. Taking the shortest verse in the Bible (John 11:35), Barry King of Grace Baptist Partnership urged us to consider Christ’s humanity, humility and victory.
    He especially applied his message to those entering the ministry, but it was a powerful sermon for all present. All this was followed by the traditional tea on the lawn. Do pray for the seminary. What a force for good it is, and can be in the years to come.
Gary Brady

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