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Exemplary Spiritual Leadership

By Jerry Wragg
January 2011 | Review by R. J. Johnston

Synopsis

In this book, Jerry Wragg investigates how leadership should be characterized in the church, and how biblical Leadership must differ from the kind of leadership promoted in the world. He explores the dynamics of leadership, particularly the character traits that need to be built up or eradicated in leaders, the dangers that leaders face and the development of future leaders: how to recognize leadership potential and encourage leadership gifts in the next generation.

  • Publisher: DayOne Publications
  • ISBN: 978-1846252006
  • Pages: 160
  • Price: £26.82
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Book Review

Reading this book brought to mind an old saying concerning leadership, particularly in the church – ‘It takes a steady hand to hold a full cup’. Clearly the aim of the book is to highlight for leaders and potential leaders in the church the need for a steady hand in exercising leadership. It does this by emphasising both the blessings and pitfalls that can upset a steady hand.

The timeliness and relevance of the subject is underlined by the fact that leadership in both the secular world and church is often in the news. Of course, this is confirmed by the way it is addressed both explicitly and implicitly in the Scriptures and not least by our Lord himself during his earthly ministry.

So it is against that biblical background that the author addresses the theme of spiritual leadership in the church. Clear warnings are given about the ever present and subtle influence that worldly ideas of leadership can exercise over Christian leaders.

Indeed, the whole book acts as a healthy reminder of this danger by keeping us aware that spiritual leaders are called and appointed by God and answerable to him.

The book is composed of three sections outlining to the reader first the ‘Dynamics of leadership’, secondly the ‘Dangers of leadership’, and thirdly the ‘Development of leadership’.

There is much wise counsel here for all who would exercise oversight in the church in any form. The opening chapter ‘A life worth living’ and the chapters dealing with criticism and handling conflict are especially helpful. These chapters on their own make the book a worthwhile read.

Overall, the author seeks to give the reader a biblical and balanced view of spiritual leadership in a readable style. I recommend it wholeheartedly.

Tags:
leadership

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