Deuteronomy

Deuteronomy
Philip Eveson Philip Eveson is a former Principal of the London Theological Seminary (LTS) and was one of the four original faculty members. The subjects he has taught at LTS have included the Biblical Languages, E
30 April, 2012 1 min read

Deuteronomy

Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries

Edward J. Woods

IVP Academic

333 pages, £11.99

ISBN: 978-1-84474-533-3

Stars:3

The original Tyndale Commentary series was much appreciated at a time when there were few modern evangelical works on the biblical text. All that has changed, and pastors, teachers and students of Scripture are spoilt for choice these days.

This commentary by an Old Testament lecturer and pastor in Australia is a worthy replacement for the one by Thompson. The Tyndale series does not aim to be devotional or to give any application. Where the present commentary excels is in the clear way it deals with what the text says and in how it conveys so well the overall message of Deuteronomy. The comments are made on the English text as found in the New International Version and when it is necessary to draw attention to Hebrew words they are always transliterated.

The first part covers introductory issues such as authorship and date and, as might be expected, there is a good airing of scholarly opinion. An early date for the exodus is favoured on the basis of the biblical evidence and the bulk of the book is acknowledged to be the work of Moses.

Some of the literary features are explored including the ‘thou’ and ‘you’ sections before considering the book’s structure where support is offered to those scholars who see Deut.12-25 as an exposition of the Ten Commandments.

The final two introductory items relate to the theology and purpose of the book including a special note on the ‘Holy War’ principle. There are brief sections on God, the people of God, the land and worship.

As to the commentary itself, each section is helpfully divided under three heads: Context, Comment and Meaning. Difficult verses are treated fairly and there is an overall respect for this important biblical book that is quoted so frequently in the New Testament.

If you do not already possess a modern up-to-date commentary on Deuteronomy here is one to consider.

Philip H Eveson,

Wrexham

Philip Eveson is a former Principal of the London Theological Seminary (LTS) and was one of the four original faculty members. The subjects he has taught at LTS have included the Biblical Languages, E
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