Subscribe now

How Sermons Work

By David Murray
May 2012 | Review by James Chittenden

Synopsis

How do sermons work? How does a preacher get from the basic nuts and bolts of a few Bible verses to the delivery of a full sermon? That’s the question David Murray answers in this instructive and immensely practical book. He demonstrates that behind the thirty to forty-five minutes we see and hear on a Sunday morning are many hours of mental, spiritual and practical labour. Like all pastoral labour, it involves head, heart and hand. Murray breaks up the sermon preparation process into a clear and simple stepby-step method, covering topics such as how to choose a text, how to introduce a sermon, how to explain a text, and how to apply it. It will provide an excellent refresher for experienced preachers and a reliable guide for those just starting out. It will also be extremely helpful to Bible class teachers, Bible Study leaders, or anyone who has to prepare a Bible message. Above all, however, it is the author’s desire that this book will also be read by those who do not preach. He wants to give non-preachers an insider’s look at sermon preparation. By taking readers behind the scenes and asking, ‘How do they do that?’ Murray wants to supply answers that will increase respect for pastors and their preaching. Author David P. Murray is Professor of Old Testament and Practical Theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He was born in Scotland and served as a pastor and lecturer there.

  • Publisher: EP Books
  • ISBN: 978-085234-748-5
  • Pages: 160
  • Price: 5.99
Buy this book »

Book Review

How sermons work.

David Murray

EP Books

£5.99

ISBN: 9780852347485

Star rating: 4 stars

 

Professor David Murray from The Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan provides a helpful and clear explanation of all that should be considered when preparing a sermon, in this short practical book. He examines the methods of preparation, discusses different preaching styles, looks at how to organise a sermon and considers how to apply the message of a particular passage.

      The author says that this book is meant primarily for Bible college students, who are preparing for the ministry. However anyone who is called to teach the word of God in any capacity will find this book helpful. It will help in preparing both sermons or and Bible studies. In addition it could serve as a refresher for the more experienced preacher. Even those who do not preach might be interested to know how much work and consideration a preacher has to put into each sermon!

 

James Chittenden,

Reigate

Book Reviews

Read our latest book reviews

Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
Why Should I Trust the Bible?

We should trust the Bible, says Timothy Paul Jones, because it is ‘grounded in the words of a man who died and rose again’ (p.111). Jones’s basic presupposition is this: ‘If we live in a world where it is possible…

See all book reviews
Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
The Pastor’s Life: Practical Wisdom from the Puritans
Matthew D Haste & Shane W Parker

This book highlights ‘some of the many lessons that today’s pastors can learn from the Puritans’ (p.151). As such it is aimed at pastors, but the lessons are really for anyone who is a Christian leader. The opening chapter provides…

Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
5 Minutes in Church History: An Introduction to the Stories of God’s Faithfulness in the History of the Church
Stephen J Nichols

What a breath of fresh air this book is! Stephen Nichols has given us 40 vignettes from church history that are brief enough to be digested over a bowl of cereal. The book doesn’t aim to be a beginner’s guide…

Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
The Misted World of Genesis One
Michael L. Drake

There have been so many books on the creation chapters of Genesis that there have to be compelling reasons to recommend another addition. When I started to read Michael Drake’s book, I must admit that, from my knowledge of the…