Subscribe now

Review

Experiencing the Spirit

By Graham Beynon
June 2007 | Review by Timothy Alford
  • Publisher: IVP
  • ISBN: 978-1-84474-150-2
  • Pages: 155
  • Price: £6.99

Book Review

A few years ago the Holy Spirit was sometimes referred to as ‘the forgotten person of the Godhead’ – such was the neglect of his person and work. In more recent times this has changed through preaching and publications, not all of which reflect a consistently biblical content.

However, this book merits attention because the author succeeds in carefully and clearly explaining what it means for a normal Christian to experience the Holy Spirit. The ten chapters begin with the new birth and conclude with future glory, with rich fillings in between. These include adoption, understanding, behaviour, empowering, gifting, and grieving the Spirit.

In the chapter entitled ‘Getting more of the Spirit’ the author refers to the baptism of the Spirit, and struggles to bring together ‘having’ the Spirit and ‘having more’ of the Spirit. In doing so he avoids extremes – which is typical of his pastoral and balanced approach as he sets out to define the normal Christian life.

This informative and engaging book is written with warmth and clarity, and provides a valuable introduction to its main subject. It should not be compared with other volumes dealing in greater depth with the person and work of the Spirit, but it is an enriching read.

If the questions suggested for study at the end of each chapter are used, the value of the book will be increased. I only wish that the list of books recommended for further reading included reference to the expositions of Martyn Lloyd-Jones, whose views on the baptism and sealing of the Spirit surely deserve comparative consideration. Even with this omission, I have no hesitation in commending a book that appealingly honours the Holy Spirit.

Timothy G. Alford
Stowmarket

Book Reviews

Read our latest book reviews

Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
Rowland Hill – The second Whitefield
Tim Shenton

‘There are three men, who are the most powerful preachers that England has ever produced, and yet only two of them [Whitefield and Spurgeon] are well known.’ As its opening words imply (p.7), this book’s aim is to present the…

See all book reviews
Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
Pray Big: Learn to Pray Like an Apostle
Alistair Begg

Of the making of books on prayer there seems to be no end. That fact probably reflects the need that almost of all of us feel for more help in this vitally important area of our Christian lives The problem,…

Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
FILM REVIEW: Matthew Henry — The life and times of the Bible commentator
Dan Pugh

Although the name of Matthew Henry has become synonymous with the whole-Bible commentary which he authored in the early 18th century, there is also much to learn from his remarkable life and the tumultuous times through which he lived. This…

Star RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar RatingStar Rating
Ephesians (Tyndale New Testament Commentary)
Darrell L Bock

Whenever a new commentary is published from the conservative viewpoint on a book of the Bible which is already well covered, there ought to be few issues of concern because there is so much literature with which to compare it.…